Pop-Up Frankiestein (toys & novelties)

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HORRORPEDIA

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Pop-Up Frankiestein was a plastic toy manufactured in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s by the Wilkin Toy Company of Hong Kong. Atop his turreted castle, Dr Frankenstein’s ghastly creation looms over all before him. The players of the game, up to three, take their trusty dagger (red, blue or green) and take turns in stabbing them into one of the slots in the body of the castle itself. All but one of these will result in nothing happening and it will then be the next player’s turn – eventually, an unlucky player will cause Frankie to leap alarmingly from his perch – as with most toys of the 60’s and 70’s, this could potentially lead to injury or heart failure.

ImageA proud possession as a child, this game was not without its concerns. Any number of the 17 (quite sharp) daggers would end up down the back of the…

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Horror Pinball Machines

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HORRORPEDIA

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Pinball machines as we now know them first appeared in the early 1930’s and almost immediately were seized upon as opportunities for branding and cash-ins of all shape and form, from sports to popular culture. Cutting through the chaff and whey to the 1970’s, the advent of solid state electronics and digital displays meant that already goggle-eyed youths could be even further entranced by a dazzling array of lights, sound and action. The ability to feature soundbites and effects from films and TV meant that the marriage of the Silver Screen and pinball was ripe for plunder, with horror films being an obvious target, the dark and dingy arcades being perfect to showcase both classic and modern monsters.

Although downloaded pinball games for phones and computers of all sizes have largely impacted the proliferation of these machines in very recent times, pinball machines decorated with classic horror icons continued to…

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