Dark Age

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Dark Age is a 1987 Australian-made film concerning not just the battle between humans and a gigantic killer crocodile but conservationists and Aboriginal people versus the local authorities who just want the beast shot and everyone to be quiet. The film is directed by Arch Nicholson (second unit director on Razorback) and stars John Jarrett (Wolf Creek both 1 and 2), Ray Meagher (Alf in teeth-grinding soap Home and Away), Nikki Coghill and Burnham Burnham (The Marsupials: The Howling III). The stunning cinematography is by Andrew Lesnie who worked on all six of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit and Lord of the Rings films. The film is based on the novel Numunwari by Grahame Webb.

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In the Northern Territory, Australia, a huge saltwater crocodile is patrolling the river system and, though held in almost God-like regard by the Native Australians, attracts less flattering comments when its…

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Baba Yaga – folklore

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“That’s not my mother’s voice I hear.
I think that Baba Yaga’s near!”

Baba Yaga is a recurrent figure in East European folklore, usually as a single entity though sometimes appearing as one of a trio of sisters, all using the same name. Baba Yaga appears as a filthy, hideous or ferocious-looking woman with the ability to fly around in a large mortar, knees tucked up to her chin, using the accompanying pestle as a blunt weapon or a rudder to guide her strange craft. Some tales omit her ability to fly but see her ‘rowing’ along the forest floor, using the pestle as an oar.

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With connections to the elements and nature, she usually makes appearances near her dwelling in birch woods and forests, where she resides in a ramshackle hut which is peculiarly perched atop chicken-like legs. These unusual foundations allow her to move her abode to different…

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Night of the Living Dead (1990)

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‘There is a fate worse than death!’

Night of the Living Dead is a 1990 US horror film directed by Tom Savini. It is a remake of George A. Romero’s 1968 horror film of the same name. Romero rewrote the original 1968 screenplay co-authored by John A. Russo

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Following the plot of the seminal original film, Barbara (Patricia Tallman: Army of Darkness, Monkey Shines) and her annoying brother, Johnnie (Bill Mosely: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2; The Devil’s Rejects) travel by car to visit the grave of their mother. At the graveside, Johnnie’s taunts of, “They’re coming to get you, Barbara”, are interrupted by not one but two shambling corpses, a tussle between corpse and male sibling leaving Johnnie dead with a cracked skull. Barbara flees but after crashing her car, is forced to sprint to the nearest dwelling, a large, remote farmhouse.

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Once there…

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Dracula in the Provinces

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Il cav. Costante Nicosia demoniaco ovvero: Dracula in Brianza, internationally released as Dracula in the Provinces,  Bite Me, Countand Young Dracula, is a 1975 Italian horror-comedy film directed by Lucio Fulci. Several writers contributed to what is more sex comedy than outright horror; Pupi Avati (Macabre), Mario Amendola, Bruno Corbucci (Django), Enzo Jannacci and Giuseppe Viola.

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Il Cavaliere Costante Nicosia (Lando Buzzanca) is the owner of Italy’s most successful toothpaste company and enjoys all the trappings there-in, including a beautiful wife, Mariu (Sylva Koscina, Lisa and the Devil), from whom he inherited the firm, and a mistress, Liu (Christa Linder, 1971’s Alien Terror). Though he adopts a bullying management style, he holds very superstitious beliefs, regularly rubbing the hump of his hunchbacked assistant, Peppino (Antonio Allocca) for good luck and coercing his virgin housemaid to urinate over the remains…

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Vampire in Venice

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Vampire in Venice is a 1988 Italian-made horror film starring Klaus Kinski, Christopher Plummer and Donald Pleasence. Vampire in Venice was originally intended as a direct sequel to Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979), but Klaus Kinski refused to shave his head or undergo the arduous make-up.

Original director Mario Caiano left after being insulted by Kinski on-set, and Augusto Caminito took over before also leaving (never to direct again, which explains a lot). Luigi Cozzi and Kinski himself handled some of the remaining footage. Due to Kinski’s constantly disruptive behaviour, production on the film was very slow and they soon ran out of money, leaving the film disjointed and at times nonsensical. Kinski only made one more film, the ambitious, if disappointing, ‘Paganini‘.

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The plot sees Van Helsing-esque Professor Paris Catalano (Plummer) going to Venice to investigate the last known appearance of Nosferatu during the Carnival of 1786. Catalano seems…

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Day of the Dead (1985)

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Day of the Dead is a 1985 American horror film written and directed by George A. Romero and the third film in Romero’s Dead Series, being preceded byNight of the Living Dead(1968) andDawn of the Dead(1978). Though planned as the final part of the saga, the travails of humankind versus their infected dead continued for a further three films (thus far) and two un-Romero related re-hashes…thus far! The film stars Joe Pilato, Lois Cardille, Sherman Howard (billed as Howard Sherman) and Richard Liberty. Tom Savini enjoys his finest moments in charge of make-up and effects, whilst Romero alumni John Harrison composed the score.

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A helicopter circles Fort Myers, Florida, the four passengers on a recce mission for survivors from the zombie catastrophe introduced inNight of the Living Dead and last seen compromising tenement blocks, TV studios and shopping malls in Dawn of the Dead

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